Non Sequitur

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in communications/debate, logic, and notably the law, non sequiturin communications/debate, logic, and notably the law, non se... More basically refers to a conclusion which is false or unsupported by its argument. In literature or comedy non sequiturin communications/debate, logic, and notably the law, non se... More refers more specifically to a statement which does not relate to what precedes it in a bizarre and often amusing way- a funny example of non sequiturin communications/debate, logic, and notably the law, non se... More humour/humor is Monty Python’s Holy Grail ‘Burn the witch’ sketch in which a series of non sequiturin communications/debate, logic, and notably the law, non se... More conclusions are used: (paraphrased) “…You burn witches; wood also burns; so witches are made of wood. Wood floats; a duck also floats; so a witch weighs the same as a duck…” In politics we frequently hear non sequiturin communications/debate, logic, and notably the law, non se... More arguments and justifications routinely used by politicians and disguised to seem like logical rational reason, when in fact the argument/justification completely fails to support the conclusion, and bluff with force/confidence/arrogance of delivery is effectively the most persuasive factor.